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ANGLO-INDIAN RECIPE BOOKS by Bridget White

ANGLO-INDIAN RECIPE BOOKS by Bridget White
ANGLO-INDIAN RECIPE BOOKS by Bridget White

NO COPYING ALLOWED FROM THIS SITE

All the recipes and Photographs on this Site are old Family Recipes and tried and tested by the Author. Please feel free to try out these old recipes, and relish them, but desist from copying and using on other sites without the prior permission of Bridget White-Kumar. Any infringement would amount to Plagarism and infringement of Copy Right punishable by Law

Thursday, December 10, 2009

ANGLO-INDIAN BEEF ROAST

2 kg Beef from the “Round Portion” or “Top Rump part”
2 large onions cut into quarters
2 teaspoons pepper powder
2 dry chillies broken into pieces
2 sticks cinamon
2 tablespoons vinegar
Salt to taste
3 tablespoons oil
3 large potatoes pealed

Wash the meat and rub the salt and pepper well into it. Place it in a big oven- proof dish or a pressure cooker, and place on high heat. Keep turning the meat on all sides till it changes colour. Add the onions, potatoes. chillies, vinegar and sufficient water and cook either on the stove or oven till the meat is tender. Continue to simmer on low heat till the meat is nicely brown all over and the potatoes too are nicely roasted. Serve hot or cold with bread.

The same recipe can be used for making Mutton or Lamb Roast as well.

Friday, December 04, 2009

CHRISTMAS RUM AND RAISIN CAKE



500 grams refined flour or Maida
300 grams soft brown sugar
100 grams powdered white sugar
¼ teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons spice powder
1teaspoon nutmeg powder
200 grams chopped black currants
200 grams chopped raisins
100 grams chopped sultanas
100 grams chopped orange / lemon peel
100 grams chopped cherries
500 ml Rum or Brandy
250 ml Wine
500 grams butter
4 eggs beaten well
4 tablespoons milk
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon vanilla essence
1 teaspoon almond essence

Mix all the dried fruit together and soak in rum / brandy and wine for at least a month. When required drain and keep aside. Reserve the leftover rum.
Sift the flour, baking powder and salt together. Dust the soaked fruit / peel with a little flour.
Cream the butter, sugar and brown sugar well. Add the beaten eggs, almond essence and vanilla essence and mix well. Add the orange / lemon peel and dried fruits, nutmeg powder and spice powder and mix thoroughly. Slowly add the flour and fold in well. If the mixture is too thick add a little milk. Pour into a greased and papered baking tins or dishes and bake in a slow oven for about one hour or more (or until a wooden toothpick comes out clean). Remove from the oven when done. Prick the cake with a toothpick and pour the remaining rum over it.
Remove from the tin when cold and wrap tightly in foil or waxed paper and keep in an airtight container for the cake to absorb the rum.
Just before serving, heat for a minute in a microwave oven and pour some more rum on the cake while hot. Tastes delicious!!!!!

Monday, November 30, 2009

KALKALS


KALKALS
Ingredients
I kg refined flour or maida
6 eggs beaten well
2 cups thick coconut milk
½ teaspoon salt
300 grams sugar
1 teaspoon baking powder
Oil for deep frying
Mix the flour, salt, sugar and baking powder together. Add the coconut milk and eggs and knead to a soft dough. Keep aside for an hour. Form kalkals by taking small lumps of the dough and roll on the back of a fork or a wooden kalkal mould, to form a scroll. Alternately, roll out the dough and cut into fancy shapes with kalkal or cookie cutters. Heat oil in a deep pan and fry as many kalkals as possible at a time. Keep aside.
To ice the kalkals, melt 1 cup of sugar with ½ cup of water and when the sugar syrup crystallizes pour over the kalkals and mix well. Store in airtight boxes when cold.

ROSE COOKIES

ROSE COOKIES
Ingredients

½ kg refined flour or maida
250 grams rice flour (optional)
1 cup coconut milk
200 grams sugar
6 eggs beaten well
½ teaspoon salt
1 litre oil for frying
1 teaspoon vanilla essence
1 teaspoon baking powder

Mix all the ingredients together to form a smooth slightly thick batter.
Heat oil in a deep pan till it reaches boiling point. Now place the rose cookie mould into the oil to get hot. When the mould is hot enough dip it half way only into the batter and put it back immediately into the boiling oil. Shake the mould to separate the cookie from it. Heat the mould again and repeat the process. Fry rose cookies till brown. Continue in this way till the batter is finished.

Note: The batter will stick to the rose cookie mould with a hissing sound only if it is sufficiently hot otherwise it will just slide off the mould

Saturday, November 21, 2009

DUCK PULI FRY ( Duck in tamarind sauce)

Ingredients
1 dressed duck chopped into medium size pieces (de-skin if desired)
2 big onions sliced
1 teaspoon coriander powder
4 green chillies slit lengthwise
2 teaspoons chillie powder
1teaspoon chopped ginger
1 teaspoon chopped garlic
Salt to taste
2 tablespoons oil
1 cup thick tamarind juice

Heat oil in a pressure cooker and sauté the onions lightly. Add the duck and all the other ingredients and mix well. Fry for a few minutes. Add sufficient water and pressure cook on medium heat for about 15 minutes. Open the pressure cooker and add the thick tamarind juice and mix well. Continue cooking on low heat till the gravy is thick and dark brown. Serve with Chapattis, Hoppers or Dosas.

Sunday, November 01, 2009

Veal Country Captain (Cold Meat Curry)

Serves 6
Preparation Time 1 hour
Ingredients
1 kg veal from the shoulder portion (1 whole chunk)
8 medium size onions cut finely
1 teaspoon turmeric powder
1 tablespoon garlic paste
2 teaspoons chillie powder
3 tablespoons oil
1 tablespoon butter or ghee
Salt to taste
Boil the veal in sufficient water with a little salt and a pinch of turmeric till tender. Remove from heat and cool. When cold, cut the boiled veal into small pieces. Mix the chillie powder, turmeric powder, salt and garlic paste with the boiled veal pieces and keep aside.
Heat oil in a pan and fry the onions till golden brown. Remove from the pan and keep aside.
Now fry the marinated boiled veal in the same pan adding a tablespoon of butter or ghee and cook till the meat begins to look dry. Mix in the fried onions and simmer on low heat for 5 more minutes. Serve with rice or bread and a few steamed vegetables.
Note: Country Captain is usually prepared with chicken. However it can be prepared with any left over cold meat as well. Hence the name Cold Meat Curry

Sunday, October 11, 2009

TOMATO PILAF (TOMATO RICE)


Serves 6
Preparation time 45 minutes

4 large tomatoes pureed and diluted with water to get 4 cups of juice or 1 pack of tomato puree diluted to get 4 cups of juice.
2 teaspoons chopped coriander leaves
2 large onions sliced finely
2 cups Raw Rice or Basmati Rice
Salt to taste
2 teaspoons chilly powder
2 teaspoons ginger and garlic paste
4 cloves, 3 cardamoms, 3 pieces of cinnamon
4 tablespoons oil or ghee
2 teaspoons chopped fresh mint

Heat oil in a pan or a rice cooker and sauté the spices, onions, ginger garlic paste and chilly powder for a few minutes. Add the rice, salt, mint, coriander leaves and tomato juice and cook till the rice is done. Serve with salad and Chicken Curry or Pork Vindaloo.

Tuesday, September 29, 2009

MEAT AND LADY FINGERS (OKRA) CURRY


1/2 kg beef or mutton / lamb cut into medium sized pieces
1/2 kg tender lady fingers / Okras cut into 1 inch size pieces
2 medium sized onions chopped
2 large tomatoes pureed
½ cup coconut paste
A small bunch of coriander leaves chopped
1 teaspoon ginger paste
1 teaspoon garlic paste
2 teaspoons chilly powder
2 teaspoons coriander powder
1 teaspoon cumin powder
½ teaspoon tumeric powder
Salt to taste
2 green chilies chopped
2 tablespoons oil.

Heat the oil in a suitable pan or pressure cooker and fry the chopped onions till golden brown. Add the Meat, ginger and garlic paste and sauté for some time. Add the chilly powder, coriander powder, cumin powder, green chillies, coconut and salt and fry for a few minutes .Add the tomato puree and fry till the oil separates from the masala. Now add 2 cups of water and cook till the meat is tender.

Meanwhile lightly fry the lady fingers / okra in a little oil for about 2 minutes. When the meat is cooked, add the lady fingers / okra pieces into the boiling curry and cook on low heat till the gravy is sufficiently thick and the lady fingers are cooked. Garnish with chopped coriander leaves. Serve hot with plain rice.

Friday, September 18, 2009

SPICY LIVER AND ONION FRY

SPICY LIVER AND ONION FRY
½ kg beef or lamb liver sliced thinly
4 large onions chopped
1teaspoon chillie powder
1 teaspoon pepper powder
½ teaspoon turmeric powder
2 tablespoons oil
1 teaspoon ginger paste
½ teaspoon garlic paste
Salt to taste
1 teaspoon cumin powder
½ teaspoon coriander powder
1 tablespoon vinegar

Wash the liver well. Heat the oil in a pan and sauté the onions lightly. Add the sliced liver, ginger and garlic paste, salt, turmeric powder, chillie powder, cumin powder, coriander powder, pepper powder and vinegar and mix well. Cover and simmer on low heat till the liver is cooked. Add a little water while cooking if gravy is required. Serve hot with rice or bread

Monday, September 07, 2009

CHEESE TWISTS

200 grams plain flour / maida
½ teaspoon baking powder
½ teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon white pepper powder
2 tablespoons butter
½ cup shredded cheddar cheese
½ cup milk
Oil for frying

Sift flour, salt, baking powder, and pepper into a medium size mixing bowl. Cut in butter or margarine and cheese with a pastry cutter until mixture is crumbly. Sprinkle cold water over mixture; mix lightly with a fork until mixture holds together and leaves side of bowl.
Roll out on to a floured board about 12x4 inches. Cut crosswise into strips about ½ inch wide. Lift the strips carefully and twist each one gently. Heat sufficient oil in a pan and deep fry the strips till golden Or place twists 1 inch apart on ungreased baking sheets. Bake at 425° for 10 minutes, or until lightly browned. Carefully transfer cheese twists to wire racks to cool

Wednesday, August 26, 2009

ANGLO-INDIAN COOKERY BOOKS

 

1.THE BEST OF ANGLO-INDIAN CUISINE – A LEGACY is a unique collection of easy- to- follow Recipes of traditional as well as every day Anglo-Indian dishes, ranging from soups, fries, curries, rice dishes, Christmas treats etc., picking up plenty of hybrids along the way, including popular favourites like the different types of Pepper water, Ball Curry, Coconut Rice, Devil chutney etc A few home brewed wines are also included to round off the extensive flavours and tastes.

2.FLAVOURS OF THE PAST features recipes of popular and well-loved dishes of Colonial times, such as Grandma’s Country Captain Chicken, Railway Mutton Curry, Madras Pork Curry. Dak Bungalow Curry, Stuffed Snake Coy Curry, Guava Cheese, Peanut Fudge, etc, which are sure to bring back nostalgic memories.

3.ANGLO-INDIAN DELICACIES is a collection of Recipes of popular vintage and contemporary Cuisine of Colonial India. Old favourites such as Pork Bhooni, Devil Pork Curry, Calcutta Cutlets, Fish Kedegeree, Double Onions Meat Curry, Camp Soup, Bengal Lancers Shrimp Curry, Boiled Mutton chops, etc have been given a new lease of life. The recipes are simple and extremely easy to follow. The very names of the dishes will surely bring back nostalgic memories of by gone days to many. As with the earlier books, it will make a useful addition to a personal Anglo-Indian Recipe Collection

4.THE ANGLO-INDIAN FESTIVE HAMPER is a collection of popular Anglo-Indian festive treats, such as Cakes, Sweets, Christmas goodies, Puddings, Sandwiches, Preserves, Home-made Wines, etc, etc. The repertoire is rich and quite vast and takes you on a sentimental and nostalgic trip of old forgotten delicacies. These mouth watering concoctions are a mix of both ‘European’ and ‘Indian’, thus making it a veritable “Anglo-Indian” Festive Hamper. The easy-to-follow directions make the preparation of these old, popular, mouth watering goodies, simple, enjoyable and problem-free.

5. A COLLECTION OF ANGLO-INDIAN ROASTS, CASSEROLES AND BAKES is a practical and easy guide to delectable cooking. The clear step-by-step instructions describe the preparation of a variety of easy to prepare Anglo-Indian Roasts, Casseroles and Bakes such as Shepherd’s Pie, Washerman’s Pie, Roast Chicken, Macaroni and Mince, etc. A few Vegetarian Bakes and casserole dishes are also featured.

6. THE ANGLO-INDIAN SNACK BOX , is a collection of simple and easy to follow recipes of tasty snacks, short eats, nibbles and finger food. The repertoire covers a variety of vegetarian as well as non- vegetarian snacks which includes savouries, sandwiches, wraps, rolls, pastries, sweets etc and can easily be prepared from ingredients commonly available at home.

Each book is priced at : India : Rs 130.00, UK GBP 5.00, USA $10.00, Canada $10.00, Australia $10.00, UAE Rs 300.00
A set of all 6 books inclusive of Postage / Courier charges:
India: Rs 850.00, UK GBP 30.00, USA $60.00, Canada $60.00, Australia $60.00, UAE Rs 2000.00
For Copies contact : Bridget Kumar Phone: (Bangalore) +919845571254 / (0091)8025504137 / Email: bidkumar@gmail.com
John White (Chennai) 00914425595008 /mpjohnwhite@yahoo.co.in
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My Anglo-Indian Recipe Books


1.THE BEST OF ANGLO-INDIAN CUISINE – A LEGACY is a unique collection of easy- to- follow Recipes of traditional as well as every day Anglo-Indian dishes, ranging from soups, fries, curries, rice dishes, Christmas treats etc., picking up plenty of hybrids along the way, including popular favourites like the different types of Pepper water, Ball Curry, Coconut Rice, Devil chutney etc A few home brewed wines are also included to round off the extensive flavours and tastes.

2.FLAVOURS OF THE PAST features recipes of popular and well-loved dishes of Colonial times, such as Grandma’s Country Captain Chicken, Railway Mutton Curry, Madras Pork Curry. Dak Bungalow Curry, Stuffed Snake Coy Curry, Guava Cheese, Peanut Fudge, etc, which are sure to bring back nostalgic memories.

3.ANGLO-INDIAN DELICACIES is a collection of Recipes of popular vintage and contemporary Cuisine of Colonial India. Old favourites such as Pork Bhooni, Devil Pork Curry, Calcutta Cutlets, Fish Kedegeree, Double Onions Meat Curry, Camp Soup, Bengal Lancers Shrimp Curry, Boiled Mutton chops, etc have been given a new lease of life. The recipes are simple and extremely easy to follow. The very names of the dishes will surely bring back nostalgic memories of by gone days to many. As with the earlier books, it will make a useful addition to a personal Anglo-Indian Recipe Collection

4.THE ANGLO-INDIAN FESTIVE HAMPER is a collection of popular Anglo-Indian festive treats, such as Cakes, Sweets, Christmas goodies, Puddings, Sandwiches, Preserves, Home-made Wines, etc, etc. The repertoire is rich and quite vast and takes you on a sentimental and nostalgic trip of old forgotten delicacies. These mouth watering concoctions are a mix of both ‘European’ and ‘Indian’, thus making it a veritable “Anglo-Indian” Festive Hamper. The easy-to-follow directions make the preparation of these old, popular, mouth watering goodies, simple, enjoyable and problem-free.

5. A COLLECTION OF ANGLO-INDIAN ROASTS, CASSEROLES AND BAKES is a practical and easy guide to delectable cooking. The clear step-by-step instructions describe the preparation of a variety of easy to prepare Anglo-Indian Roasts, Casseroles and Bakes such as Shepherd’s Pie, Washerman’s Pie, Roast Chicken, Macaroni and Mince, etc. A few Vegetarian Bakes and casserole dishes are also featured.

6. THE ANGLO-INDIAN SNACK BOX , is a collection of simple and easy to follow recipes of tasty snacks, short eats, nibbles and finger food. The repertoire covers a variety of vegetarian as well as non- vegetarian snacks which includes savouries, sandwiches, wraps, rolls, pastries, sweets etc and can easily be prepared from ingredients commonly available at home.

Each book is priced at : India : Rs 130.00, UK GBP 5.00, USA $10.00, Canada $10.00, Australia $10.00, UAE Rs 300.00
A set of all 6 books inclusive of Postage / Courier charges:
India: Rs 850.00, UK GBP 30.00, USA $60.00, Canada $60.00, Australia $60.00, UAE Rs 2000.00
For Copies contact : Bridget Kumar Phone: (Bangalore) +919845571254 / (0091)8025504137 / Email: bidkumar@gmail.com
John White (Chennai) 00914425595008 /mpjohnwhite@yahoo.co.in
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Thursday, August 20, 2009

SIMPLE PEPPER CHICKEN

Serves 6
Preparation Time 30 minutes
1 kg chicken cut into medium size pieces
3 large onions sliced finely
2 teaspoons pepper powder
1 teaspoon turmeric powder
2 tablespoons oil
salt to taste
Heat oil in a pan and fry the onions lightly. Add the chicken and mix in the pepper powder, tumeric powder and salt. Add ½ cup of water and cook on low heat till the chicken is tender and semi dry. Simmer for 10 more minutes stirring occasionally till the chicken gets a good shiny colour.
Alternately, the chicken can be par boiled with a little water and then added to the sautéed onions and pepper

Thursday, August 06, 2009

My New Cookery Book... THE ANGLO-INDIAN SNACK BOX


THE ANGLO-INDIAN SNACK BOX
THE ANGLO-INDIAN SNACK BOX is a collection of simple and easy to follow recipes of tasty snacks, short eats, nibbles and finger food. The repertoire covers a variety of vegetarian as well as non-vegetarian snacks which includes savouries, sandwiches,wraps, rolls, pastries, sweets etc and can easily be prepared from ingredients commonly available at home.

Friday, July 17, 2009

Spicy Pork Spare Ribs

1 kg Pork Spare Ribs
2 teaspoons Coriander Powder
1 teaspoon Cumin Powder
2 teaspoon finely chopped garlic
2 tablespoons oil
Salt to taste
2 teaspoons chillie Powder
2 tablespoons vinegar
3 onions finely chopped
2 tablespoons Tomato sauce

Marinate the Pork Spare Ribs with the coriander powder, cumin powder, chillie powder, vinegar, tomato sauce and salt for one hour. Heat oil in a pan and sauté the onions and chopped garlic till golden brown. Add the marinated Pork Spare Ribs and mix well. Add sufficient water and cook till tender. Continue frying on low heat till the gravy dries up. Serve with rice or Bread.

Monday, July 06, 2009

STUFFED SNAKE GOURD IN GRAVY

1 kg beef or mutton mince
1 medium sized snake gourd scrape and cut into 2 inch pieces after removing the insides
3 medium sized onions chopped
3 large tomatoes pureed
½ cup coconut paste
A small bunch of coriander leaves chopped
1 teaspoon ginger paste
1 teaspoon garlic paste
2 teaspoons chilly powder
1 teaspoon spice powder
2 teaspoons coriander powder
½ teaspoon turmeric powder
Salt to taste
2 green chilies chopped
3 tablespoons oil.

Wash the snake gourd and the mince. Marinate the mince with a teaspoon of chilly powder, turmeric powder, a little salt and some chopped coriander leaves. In a pan heat the oil and fry the chopped onions till golden brown. Add the ginger garlic paste and sauté for some time. Add the chilly powder, coriander powder, spice powder, green chilies, coconut and salt and fry for a few minutes .Add the tomato puree and fry till the oil separates from the masala. Now add 2 cups of water and bring to boil. Meanwhile stuff the snake gourd rings with the marinated mince. Pack each ring tightly so that the mince does not fall out. Slowly drop the stuffed snake gourd pieces into the boiling curry and cook on low heat till the gravy is sufficiently thick and the mince is cooked. Garnish with chopped coriander leaves. Serve hot with coconut rice or plain rice.

Wednesday, June 24, 2009

CHICKEN FRITTERS

Ingredients
½ kg boneless chicken cut into small pieces
3 tablespoons chillie garlic sauce
3 tablespoons corn flour
3 tablespoons plain flour (maida)
salt to taste
Oil for deep frying

Make a batter with the corn flour, plain flour / maida and salt with sufficient water. The batter should be slightly thick. Mix the chicken pieces with the sauce and mix into the batter. Heat oil in a pan and drop in spoonfuls of the mixture a little at a time and deep fry till golden brown. Use kitchen absorbent paper to remove excess oil. Serve hot with tomato sauce.

Sunday, June 07, 2009

Braised Ox Tongue

Serves 6
Preparation Time approx 1 hour
Ingredients

1 Ox Tongue
2 onions sliced
2 Carrots peeled and diced
1 teaspoon coriander powder
1 teaspoon chillie powder
½ teaspoon spice powder or garam masala powder
3 tablespoons Oil
Salt to taste

Wash the Ox Tongue and boil it in salted water till tender. Cool then slice it.
Heat oil in a pan and sauté the onions till slightly brown. Add the carrots, chillie powder, coriander powder, spice powder / garam masala powder, a little salt and about 4 tablespoons of the tongue stock and cook till the carrots are soft. Mash the carrots well. Now add the cooked slices of Ox Tongue and the remaining stock. Mix well and simmer on low heat for about 10 minutes. Serve with Bread or with rice and steamed vegetables

Thursday, May 28, 2009

Savoury Brain Fritters

2 Sheep Brains or ½ kg Beef Brain
2 teaspoons pepper powder
3 tablespoons flour (Maida)
1 egg beaten
Salt to taste
Oil for frying

Wash the Brains well and remove the veins etc. Cut them into 1” pieces. Make a batter with the beaten egg, flour, salt, pepper powder and a little water. Mix with the pieces of brain. Heat oil in a pan and when drop in the batter covered brain and deep fry till golden brown. Serve hot.

For a difference in taste, use Besan flour instead of Maida and finely chopped green chillies, green coriander and onions may be added to the batter

Thursday, May 07, 2009

TOMATO PALAU (PILAF)

Serves 6
Preparation time 45 minutes
4 large tomatoes pureed and diluted with water to get 3 cups of juice or 1 pack of tomato puree diluted to get 3 cups of juice.
2 teaspoons chopped coriander leaves
2 large onions sliced finely
2 cups Raw Rice or Basmati Rice
Salt to taste
2 teaspoons chilly powder
1 teaspoon ginger paste
1 teaspoon garlic paste
2 cloves, 3 cardamoms, 3 pieces of cinnamon
4 tablespoons oil or ghee
2 teaspoons chopped fresh mint
Heat oil in a pan or a rice cooker and sauté the spices, onions, ginger garlic paste and chilly powder for a few minutes. Add the rice, salt, mint, coriander leaves and tomato juice and cook till the rice is done. Serve with salad and Chicken Curry or Pork Vindaloo.

Monday, April 27, 2009

MINCE AND TATTIES - (MINCE AND POTATOES ) Tracking down traditional Scottish food in India

MINCE AND POTATOES & EGG KEDEGREE
Article from the Scottish Times 12/04/09....Pamela Timms
In Bangalore,last week I met Bridget White-Kumar, an obsessive chronicler of all things Anglo-Indian and author of five recipe books crammed with such delights as “grandma’s country captain chicken” and “railway mutton curry”.
At first glance, Bangalore, the home of modern India’s IT miracle, is a city that more than any other has freed itself from every trace of the Raj. Yet I found a community that has held on to many Scottish and English food traditions and used them to carve out its own identity.
Kumar greeted me with tea and shortbread. When she rustled up mince and tatties and said I could borrow her precious old recipe books, I was ready for her to adopt me. They include a rare 1874 edition of the Madras Cookery Book, written anonymously by “an English resident’s wife”, which contains recipes — or “receipts” as the memsahib called them — for Caledonian classics such as Scotch broth, mashed turnips and scones.
Bridget is no misty-eyed imperialist but a member of Bangalore’s 15,000-strong Anglo-Indian community, descendents of Scottish and English families who came to seek their fortunes in the colonies.
After independence, one might have imagined Anglo-Indians would have been glad to see the back of meat loaf and sago pudding, but the community, although proudly Indian, identifies closely with Scottish and English traditions and food.
Bridget’s own grandfather was a Scot named Percy Edgar Joseph and, through the enthusiastic scribblings of her mother and grandmother, she has inherited a vast collection of Anglo-Indian recipes.
Her mince and tatties, although unsurprisingly more peppery than we’re used to, bears a striking resemblance to the one I grew up with. I was amused to hear that it occupied the same place in her family culinary repertoire as it did in my family's. “It’s what we have when I can’t think what else to make,” she says.
While we devoured the mince, kedgeree and semolina pudding, Bridget told me about her early life on the British-run Kolar Gold Fields, in Karnataka where her father worked. Although she can’t remember where the mince and tatties recipe came from, the fact she remembers more MacIntyres and MacDonalds than Malhotras and Methas in her community offers some strong clues.
I left Bangalore with a heavy stomach and even heavier heart, vowing to go back as soon as possible.

Tuesday, April 14, 2009

ANGLO-INDIAN VEAL CHOPS

Serves 6
Preparation Time 45 minutes
½ kg good veal chops (Flatten them)
3 or 4 potatoes (Boil peal and cut each in half lengthwise)
4 big onions sliced
2 green chilies slit lengthwise
2 teaspoons pepper powder
Salt to taste
3 tablespoons oil
Pressure cook the veal chops with a little water till tender letting some soup remain. Open the pressure cooker and add the onions, green chilies, salt, pepper powder and oil and mix well. Keep cooking on low heat till the soup dries up and the onions and meat are a nice brown. Just before turning off the heat add the boiled potatoes and mix once so that the masala covers the potatoes. Serve hot with bread or rice.

Friday, March 20, 2009

ALMORTH (Mixed Meat and vegetable Stew)

This dish is a combination of meat, chicken, pork and vegetables. It’s a very old Anglo-Indian recipe. However, any combination of meat could be used as per personal preference. The same recipe could be used with chicken only.
Ingredients
¼ kg Beef
¼ kg mutton / lamb
½ kg chicken
¼ kg pork
A few carrots and beans chopped into medium size pieces (or any other English vegetables)
3 potatoes peeled and cut into quarters
2 teaspoons chillie powder
½ teaspoon turmeric powder
2 teaspoons pepper powder
1 teaspoon coriander powder
4 dry red chillies broken into pieces
2 teaspoons chopped garlic
2 pieces cinnamon
5 cloves
3 onions sliced
2 tomatoes chopped
2 tablespoons chopped mint
3 tablespoons oil
Salt to taste
2 tablespoons coconut paste
2 tablespoons vinegar

Cut the meat, chicken and pork into small pieces. Heat oil in a pressure cooker or a suitable vessel and add the onions, cinnamon, cloves and chopped garlic. Fry till the onions turn golden brown. Add the mutton, beef, chicken and pork also the chillie powder, turmeric powder, pepper powder, salt and tomatoes and mix well. Fry till the tomatoes turn to pulp. Add the broken dry red chillies, mint and the coconut paste and mix well. Add sufficient water and pressure cook for 10 minutes ( 6 to 8 whistles). Turn off the heat. Open the cooker when the pressure dies down and add the chopped vegetables and vinegar and simmer on low heat till the vegetables are cooked and the gravy is thick.
Serve with rice, chapattis or bread.

Sunday, March 08, 2009

DUCK ROAST

1 whole duck with the skin
2 or 3 pods of garlic chopped very finely
1 teaspoon chopped ginger
2 teaspoons white pepper
Salt to taste
2 teaspoons lime juice
2 tablespoons oil
1 tablespoon butter or ghee

Wash the duck well. In a big pan or pressure cooker heat the oil and then fry the duck together with the chopped ginger and garlic till it is a light brown. Add the pepper powder, salt, lime juice and 2 or 3 cups of water and cook till the duck is tender. Keep simmering till all the water dries up. Add a tablespoon of butter or ghee and keep on frying on low heat till the duck is nicely roasted and brown all over. (The duck can be roasted in an oven instead of as above if desired). Serve hot or cold with steamed vegetables or mash potato

Tuesday, February 24, 2009

LEMON AND ALMOND CAKE

250 grams butter
250 grams sugar (powdered)
3 Eggs beaten
4 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon / lime juice
2 teaspoons grated rind of lemons
200 grams powdered almonds or almond powder
1 teaspoon baking powder
200 grams plain flour
A pinch of salt
4 tablespoons icing sugar
Preheat the oven to 160 degrees centigrade. Grease and line a 22 cm baking tin.Sift the flour, baking powder and salt together. Cream the butter and sugar together until light and creamy. Add the beaten eggs and mix well. Stir in the flour, almond powder, lemon rind and lime juice. Spoon the mixture into the greased baking tin and smoothen the top. Bake for 45 to 55 minutes till the top is golden brown and the cake is cooked. Dust the top with icing sugar. Serve hot or cold.

Saturday, February 21, 2009

DRY CHICKEN FRY


1 kg chicken cut into medium size pieces
2 onions sliced finely
1 teaspoon turmeric powder
2 tablespoons oil
1 teaspoon chilly powder
Salt to taste
½ teaspoon spice powder or garam masala powder

Wash the chicken and marinate it with the salt, chilly powder, turmeric powder and spice powder for about 10 minutes. Meanwhile heat oil in a pan and sauté the onions to golden brown. Toss in the marinated chicken pieces and mix well. Close the pan with a lid and cook on slow heat for about 15 minutes till the chicken is cooked. Add a teaspoon of ghee or butter and fry till all the gravy dries up and the chicken is dry. Serve with bread or pepper water and rice.

Sunday, February 08, 2009

SHEEP’S HEAD CURRY

1-sheep’s head skinned and cut into medium pieces
3-tablespoon’s oil
2-large onions chopped finely
2 green chillies slit lengthwise
1 teaspoon ginger paste
1 teaspoon garlic paste
½ teaspoon turmeric powder
2 teaspoons chillie powder
2 teaspoons cumin powder
2 teaspoons corriander powder
1teaspoon spice powder /garam masala powder
Salt to taste 2 teaspoons chopped garlic
Wash the pieces of sheep’s head well. Boil with a little water in a pressure cooker till cooked. In another vessel, sauté the onions, green chilies and the ginger and garlic paste for some time. Add the chillie powder, cumin powder, coriander powder, turmeric powder, spice powder and kuskus powder and fry for some time with a little water. Add the cooked sheep’s head pieces along with the stock, chopped garlic and salt and simmer till the gravy is thick. Garnish with chopped coriander leaves.

Wednesday, January 28, 2009

Chicken Jalfrazie

Jalfrazie is a sautéd dish, which can be prepared with meat, poultry, sea food etc.
The word “Jalfrazie” came from 2 words: “Jal” meaning “spicy or pungent” and “Frazie” meaning “Fried”. As in the case of almost all of our cuisine, which started out as insipid concoctions, in the days of the British Raj, the original “Jal Frezie” was bland and tasteless. The Colonial servants would fry up the leftover Christmas Turkey and Chicken Roasts with some pepper, chillies, etc., for Breakfast the next day. Over the years many more ingredients and spices were added to this dish to make it as spicy and delicious as it is today and it has become synonymous with the cuisine of Anglo-Indians of West Bengal.
Chicken Jalfrazie
Serves 6
Preparation Time 1 hour
Ingredients

1 kg Boneless Chicken cut into cubes
1 teaspoon cumin seeds
3 dry red chillies broken into bits
1 teaspoon garlic paste
1 teaspoon ginger paste
3 tomatoes chopped
2 onions sliced finely
1 teaspoon spice powder or garam masala powder
1 teaspoon peppercorns
3 tablespoons oil
Salt to taste

Heat oil in a suitable pan and add the cumin seeds. When they begin to splutter add the dry red chillies, onions and pepper corns and fry till golden brown. Add the chicken and sauté for a few minutes till it changes colour. Now add all the other ingredients and stir well. Simmer on low heat till the chicken is tender and the gravy is quite thick. Serve with rice, chapattis or bread.

Sunday, January 18, 2009

ALMOND CHOCLATE FUDGE

Makes 24 pieces
Preparation time 1 hour
Ingredients

100 grams cocoa powder
1 tin condensed milk
300 grams sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla essence
4 tablespoons ghee or butter
1 cup chopped almonds
½ cup milk

Melt the sugar with the milk and condensed milk in a thick bottomed vessel. Add the cocoa powder and mix well. Add the chopped almonds, vanilla essence and ghee and mix well. Simmer on low heat till the mixture becomes thick and leaves the sides of the vessel. Pour on to a greased plate and decorate with a few almond slivers. When slightly cool cut into squares.

Monday, January 05, 2009

SAUSAGES… Appetizer or a Quick-and-easy Meal?

The meaning of the word “Sausage” in the dictionary means “Chopped or ground meat that has been blended with spices and other seasonings and usually stuffed in natural or manufactured casings”.
The origin of meat processing is lost in antiquity but probably began when mankind learned that salt is an effective preservative. Sausage making evolved as an effort to economize and preserve meat that could not be consumed fresh at slaughter. Sausage makers use almost all parts of the animal carcass that cannot be used in other ways.
The less tender cuts and organ meats are ground, spiced and made into delicious sausages. The procedure of stuffing meat into the sausage casings remains basically the same today as in the olden days. However, sausage making has now become a culinary art and is now available in a great number of varieties and flavours. Sausages have grown in popularity over the centuries. Today more than 250 varieties of sausages are manufactured and sold worldwide. Some of these varieties can actually be traced back to the town and country of origin. The contemporary role of sausage fits conveniently into our modern lifestyles as an elegant appetizer for entertaining as well as the main course in "quick-and-easy" meals. Sausages are made from beef, veal, pork, lamb, poultry and wild game, or from any combination of these meats. Traditionally, sausages were formed into a symmetrical shape, but now they can be found in a variety of shapes and sizes to meet consumers' needs and fancies.

There are lots of innovative ways that you could use sausages besides having them with your Toast and Eggs at Breakfast. You could slice / dice fried sausages and serve them on crackers with cheese as an appetizer. Dice them and add in salads, soups, curries, etc. Grill the sausages and eat with a creamy garlic dip. Use them in Casseroles and Bakes with other vegetables and meats or you could just make a very delicious curry dish with them as under.

SAVOURY SAUSAGE CURRY
500 grams pork or beef (pepper) sausages
2 big tomatoes chopped
2 large onions sliced finely
2 green chilies sliced lengthwise
1 teaspoon ginger paste
1 teaspoon chopped garlic
2 tablespoons oil
1 teaspoon chilly powder
½ teaspoon tumeric powder
½ teaspoon coriander powder
½ teaspoon cumin powder
Salt to taste
Heat oil in a pan and add the sausages and a little water. Cook on low heat till the water evaporates and the sausages turn golden brown. Remove from heat and slice the sausages into halves.
In the same oil add the onions, chopped garlic and green chillies and fry till golden brown. Add the ginger paste and fry for 2 or 3 minutes. Now add the tomatoes, turmeric, chillie powder, coriander powder, cumin powder and salt and fry till the tomatoes turn pulpy. Add 1 cup of water and bring to boil. Add the sliced sausages and cook on low heat till the gravy becomes thick. Serve with bread or rice