Foodieblogroll Ads

NO COPYING ALLOWED FROM THIS SITE

All the recipes and Photographs on this Site are old Family Recipes and tried and tested by the Author. Please feel free to try out these old recipes, and relish them, but desist from copying and using on other sites without the prior permission of Bridget White-Kumar. Any infringement would amount to Plagarism and infringement of Copy Right punishable by Law

Monday, December 22, 2014

ALMORTH - A MIXED MEAT STEW - FOR CHRISTMAS BREAKFAST

















ALMORTH - A MIXED MEAT STEW FOR CHRISTMAS BREAKFAST 
Almorth or Mixed Meat Stew is made with a combination of different meats, such as mutton or lamb, chicken, pork and vegetables. It’s a very old Anglo-Indian Dish. This Stew was a 'must have' for Christmas or Easter Breakfast in almost all Anglo-Indian Homes in the olden days and was eaten with bread or rollsHowever, any combination of meat could be used as per personal preference. The same recipe could be used with chicken only. 
Serves 6  Preparation Time 1 hour
Ingredients
¼ kg Beef                         
¼ kg mutton / lamb
½ kg chicken
¼ kg pork
A few carrots and beans chopped into medium size pieces (or any other English vegetables)
3 potatoes peeled and cut into quarters
2 teaspoons chillie powder
½ teaspoon turmeric powder
2 teaspoons pepper powder
1 teaspoon coriander powder
4 dry red chillies broken into pieces
2 teaspoons chopped garlic
2 pieces cinnamon
5 cloves
3 onions sliced
2 tomatoes chopped
2 tablespoons chopped mint
3 tablespoons oil
Salt to taste
2 tablespoons coconut paste
2 tablespoons vinegar

Cut the meat, chicken and pork into small pieces. Heat oil in a pressure cooker or a suitable vessel and add the onions, cinnamon, cloves and chopped garlic. Fry till the onions turn golden brown. Add the mutton, beef, chicken and pork together with the chillie powder, turmeric powder, pepper powder, salt coriander powder and tomatoes and mix well.  Fry till the tomatoes turn to pulp. Add the broken dry red chillies, mint and the coconut paste and mix well. Add sufficient water and cook till the meat is soft and tender. If cooking in a pressure cooker, turn off the heat after 6 to 8 whistles. Now add the chopped vegetables and vinegar and simmer on low heat till the vegetables are cooked. Serve with rice, chapattis or bread.

Friday, November 28, 2014

BRIDGET WHITE DIARIES - THE SHRILANKA DAILY MIRROR 2014-10-30





















THE SHRILANKA DAILY MIRROR          2014-10-30 16:08:45
about:blank
Bottom of Form
The Bridget White Diaries
- See more at: http://life.dailymirror.lk/article/9930/the-bridget-white-diaries-a-taste-of-history#sthash.EbzmjLzD.dpuf
You call them Burghers, we call them 'Anglo-Indians'. Just like in Sri Lanka,  this is a community of mixed ancestry: Portuguese, Dutch, British and - Indian.  After independence in 1947, the Anglo-Indians began to shrink. There was a variety of reasons. Some of it was social ostracism by other Indians : especially towards those with European skin-tones and features. Thousands also left simply to seek better prospects: mostly in Australia, England, the United States and Canada.  

But along with them,  their unique, amalgamated cuisine too, threatened to say goodbye to India. The British Shepherd's pie (the Indian curried version being 'cottage pie'),  mutton or beef glace (which, to Indian cooks, came to be known as 'glassy'), : many of the delights common in thousands of Indian households began to be replaced by the ubiquitious, tandoori clay-oven cuisine of the Indian North. Punjabi butter chicken took the place of the Sunday lamb roast,  paneer (cottage cheese) replaced glazed baby carrots and new potatoes: In restaurants, on flights, in homes: the culinary genre born of the marriage of western and eastern cultures began to wither up and die.

That is, till Bridget White-Kumar sat up and decided to do something about it.  White-Kumar was born to British, Portuguese and Dutch ancestry and grew up in Karnataka in southern India.  The Whites decided to stay put in their home country. "This is where we belong and we are well integrated into the mainstream," says White-Kumar, even as she stirs a sauce, chops onions and keeps an eagle eye on a roast in the oven.


Her sprawling kitchen is like an impressive workshop, with every tool and implement needed by a master-chef.  After all and even though she is 62 and a grandmother, Bridget White-Kumar is not only a home-maker. She is also a food consultant to various five-star hotels across India and the author of seven best-selling recipe books on Anglo-Indian cuisine, whose condensation into one, UK-published volume, won her the 2012 Gourmand World Cook Book Award for 'The best culinary history book in India".

"Many of the older generation cooked from intuition and memory rather than from a written recipe," says White.  "In these days of instant mixes, few find the time for even a simple meal, let alone the traditional dishes of our forefathers. That's when I decided to compile the recipes and preserve the very unique heritage of our cuisine."

Even non Anglo-Indians who grew up in India's army cantonments of the sixties are die-hard fans of White-Kumar's commendable venture. Due to the great number of Anglo-Indians in military service, it is their cuisine that dominated club kitchens  From the quirkily named 'pepper water' to 'sheep's head curry', from 'trotters in gravy' to 'washerman's pie', White-Kumar's recipes evoke aromatic nostalgia and memories of kitchens filled with clouds of steam,  tantalizing spirals of spices and the pleasing sight of well-marinated cuts in old-fashioned 'meat-safes'.  It was an epoch of coalescence, of brown gravies and mango chutneys that gave the inherently contradictory occidental-oriental relationship an extraordinary and entirely tasty culinary genre of its own.

White's collection includes selections dedicated to roasts, casseroles and bakes, snacks, egg delicacies but also one entirely for vegetarians and even recipes for home-made wines. Besides the modestly-priced collection of seven books (USD 10,- each) which can be ordered directly from White at bidkumar@gmail.com or bridgetkumar@yahoo.com,  the indefatigible and ever-smiling queen of the kitchen also writes a highly popular blog.

"Try my recipes," she says shyly, as she turns an upside-down pudding inside out, pineapples glistening and browned to perfection. "I promise you not only a gastronomic delight but also a rendezvous with history."

Text by Padma Rao Sundarji in New Delhi


- See more at: http://life.dailymirror.lk/article/9930/the-bridget-white-diaries-a-taste-of-history#sthash.EbzmjLzD.dpuf

Friday, November 21, 2014

MAKE YOUR CHRISTMAS PUDDING ON STIR UP SUNDAY


STIR-UP SUNDAY’ is also known as ‘Christmas Pudding Sunday’ and falls on the last Sunday before Advent. (Advent begins 4 Sundays before Christmas). The Christmas Pudding was invariably made on Stir-up Sunday to give it time to mature. The Pudding is served after dinner on Christmas Day. In the olden days making the Christmas Pudding was a family event where every member of the family would give the Christmas Pudding a stir and make a wish. A coin, a ring or a thimble were sometimes added to the pudding mixture and the person who got it in his / her piece of the pudding on Christmas day was supposed to be lucky. The finger ring would foretell a wedding to the person who got it.
Stir-Up Sunday’ falls on the 23rd November this year. So get your ingredients ready and everyone join in to ‘stir up the Christmas Pudding’ 




















CHRISTMAS  PUDDING
Serves 6 Preparation time 1 hour
Ingredients
 200 grams fresh bread crumbs                     
200 grams butter
2 teaspoons instant coffee (Nescafe or Bru) 
2 teaspoons golden syrup or date syrup
½ teaspoon baking powder                            
2 eggs beaten well
¼ cup rum                                                      
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon and cloves
¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg                           
100 grams chopped raisins
100 grams chopped black currants                        
100 grams mixed peel
½ teaspoon salt                                              
100 grams sugar
Cream the butter and sugar together then add the eggs and mix well. Gradually add all the other ingredients and mix well. Grease a Pudding Mould or any suitable bowl with butter. Pour the pudding mixture into it. Steam the pudding for about 1 hour on low heat either in a pressure cooker or a suitable pan or steamer till it is firm to touch
Note:  This pudding can be made weeks in advance and refrigerated till required. Steam for 10 minute or microwave for 3 minutes before serving. For a more exotic taste, when still warm make a few small holes all over the pudding and pour about 6 tablespoons of rum over it
HOW TO FLAME YOUR CHRISTMAS PUDDING
The flaming of the pudding needs a steady hand and for safety reasons, should not be done by someone who has enjoyed too much wine.
Pour about 3 tablespoons of rum or brandy into a metal ladle or a deep spoon and carefully heat over a gas flame or lit candle till the liquor bursts into flame. Quickly pour the flaming  rum or brandy over the pudding and take it to the dinner table. Make sure the lights are out when taking it to the table for a grand entrance. Once the flames have subsided, serve with, cream or custard.

Tuesday, November 04, 2014

HURRY-BURRY CHICKEN CURRY OR CHICKEN CURRY IN A HURRY














HURRY-BURRY CHICKEN CURRY OR CHICKEN CURRY IN A HURRY 
Indian English is a fascinating creative combination of old English expressions from colonial times, grammatical constructions and direct translations from the native speaker’s language, words borrowed from other colonial languages, and especially Indian languages such as Hindi, together with simplifications of English grammar that increase the user-friendliness of the language. Just as the name implies, this delicious Chicken Curry can be made in a hurry. However, don’t be too much in haste to get it done as your ‘hurry-burry’ can spoil the Curry!

Serves 6     Preparation  and cooking Time 30 Minutes
Ingredients
1 kg chicken jointed and cut into medium size pieces
2 Tomatoes chopped finely
2 large onions chopped                              
½ teaspoon turmeric powder
2 or 3 teaspoons chillie powder as per choice 
1 teaspoon cumin powder
1 teaspoon coriander powder
3 cloves
2 small pieces of cinnamon
2 cardamoms
2  teaspoons ginger garlic paste                  
3 tablespoons oil         
Salt to taste                                                  
2 tablespoons chopped coriander leaves


Heat oil in a pan and add the onions, Fry till golden brown. Add the cinnamon, cloves, cardamom and ginger garlic paste and sauté for a few minutes .Now add the chicken, chopped tomatoes, salt, chillie powder turmeric powder, coriander powder and cumin powder and fry for some time till the oil separates from the mixture. Add sufficient water and cook till the chicken is done and the gravy is thick. Serve with rice or any Indian Bread. 

Thursday, October 30, 2014

BRINJAL PICKLE



½ kg tender long purple or green brinjals
3 tablespoons chilly powder
2 tablespoons chopped garlic
50 grams fresh ginger
1 cup vinegar
1 tablespoon mustard powder
1 teaspoon turmeric powder
1 cup Gingerly (Til) Oil or Refined oil
1 cup of sugar
2 tablespoons salt
A few curry leaves (optional)
Wash and dry the brinjals well. Cut the brinjals into medium size pieces. Peel the ginger and chop into tiny bits. Heat the oil in a pan. Add the curry leaves, chopped ginger and garlic and sauté on low heat for a few minutes. Add the chilly powder, mustard powder and turmeric powder and fry for a minute. Now add the brinjals and salt and fry for 5 minutes on low heat. Add the vinegar and sugar and mix well. Cook till the sugar dissolves and the Brinjals are just cooked. Cool and store in bottles.
This pickle will last for a month.

BRINJAL PICKLE



½ kg tender long purple or green brinjals
3 tablespoons chilly powder
2 tablespoons chopped garlic
50 grams fresh ginger
1 cup vinegar
1 tablespoon mustard powder
1 teaspoon turmeric powder
1 cup Gingerly (Til) Oil or Refined oil
1 cup of sugar
2 tablespoons salt
A few curry leaves (optional)
Wash and dry the brinjals well. Cut the brinjals into medium size pieces. Peel the ginger and chop into tiny bits. Heat the oil in a pan. Add the curry leaves, chopped ginger and garlic and sauté on low heat for a few minutes. Add the chilly powder, mustard powder and turmeric powder and fry for a minute. Now add the brinjals and salt and fry for 5 minutes on low heat. Add the vinegar and sugar and mix well. Cook till the sugar dissolves and the Brinjals are just cooked. Cool and store in bottles.
This pickle will last for a month.

Sunday, October 19, 2014

HOME MADE ANGLO-INDIAN MUSTARD SAUCE FOR SANDWICHES ETC

HOME MADE ANGLO-INDIAN MUSTARD SAUCE FOR SANDWICHES ETC

This sauce can be used as a spread for sandwiches by mixing it with shredded meat, vegetables, mayonnaise etc. It can also be eaten as a side relish with any type of Roasted Meat, Chicken Turkey, Duck etc.
50 grams ordinary black or brown mustard
10 grams white mustard
1 teaspoon chillie powder
2 teaspoons garlic paste
2 tablespoons sugar
Salt to taste
A small piece of Drumstick Bark
1 cup white vinegar
Grind all the above to a smooth paste. Add a little more vinegar to make the paste into a sauce like consistency. Refrigerate and use when required.
Note: In case the drumstick bark is not available substitute with a stick of cinnamon.

Monday, September 29, 2014

MUTTON /l LAMB MINCE FRY





Serves 6   Preparation and Cooking Time 45 minutes
½ kg Fine Mutton Mince / Ground Mutton / Lamb 
2 big onions chopped
½ teaspoon turmeric powder                  
1 teaspoon chopped garlic
1teaspoon chopped ginger                    
2 green chilies chopped finely
1 small bunch coriander leaves            
2 tablespoons oil
Salt to taste                                           
1 teaspoon chillie powder
Heat the oil in a pan and fry the onions till golden brown. 
Add the chopped ginger, garlic and green chilies, and sauté for 3 minutes.  
Add the mince, turmeric powder, chillie powder and salt and mix well. 
Add the chopped coriander leaves and cook on low heat for about 20 minutes to ½ an hour till the mince is cooked and all the water evaporates. 
Keep Simmering on low heat till the mince is almost dry and gives out a nice aroma.  

Tuesday, August 26, 2014

ANGLO-INDIAN RECIPE BOOKS

BRIDGET’S ANGLO-INDIAN RECIPE BOOKS

1. ANGLO-INDIAN CUISINE – A LEGACY OF FLAVOURS FROM THE PAST is a comprehensive and unique collection of easy- to- follow Recipes of popular and well loved Anglo-Indian dishes. The repertoire is rich and vast, ranging from the outright European Cutlets, Croquettes, pasties, roasts, etc, to mouth watering Curries, Side dishes, Spicy Fries, Foogaths, Biryani and Palaus, Pickles, Chutneys etc, picking up plenty of hybrids along the way. The very names of old time favorite dishes such as Yellow Coconut Rice and Mince Ball (Kofta) Curry, Pepper water, Mulligatawny Soup, Grandma’s Country Captain Chicken, Railway Mutton Curry, Dak Bungalow Curry, Crumb Chops, Ding Ding, Stews, Duck Buffat, Almorth, etc, which were so popular during the Raj Era are sure to bring back nostalgic and happy memories. These popular Anglo-Indian dishes will take you on an exotic nostalgic journey to Culinary Paradise. It is a practical and easy guide to delectable cooking. The book with its clear step-by-step instructions, describes the preparation of a variety of Anglo-Indian Dishes. The easy-to-follow directions make cooking simple and problem- free.
ANGLO-INDIAN CUISINE – A LEGACY OF FLAVOURS FROM THE PAST has been selected as WINNER FROM INDIA under the category BEST CULINARY HISTORY BOOK by GOURMAND INTERNATIONAL COOK BOOK AWARDS 2012
Price per book : India : Rs175..00, Australia: A$15.00, UAE: Rs.350.00, Canada C$15.00, UK: GBP 8.00, USA: $15.00

 2.ANGLO-INDIAN DELICACIES is a collection of Recipes of popular vintage and contemporary Cuisine of Colonial India. Old favourites such as Pork Bhooni, Devil Pork Curry, Calcutta Cutlets, Fish Kedegeree, Double Onions Meat Curry, Camp Soup, Bengal Lancers Shrimp Curry, Boiled Mutton chops, etc have been given a new lease of life. The recipes are simple and extremely easy to follow. The very names of the dishes will surely bring back nostalgic memories of by gone days to many. As with the earlier books, it will make a useful addition to a personal Anglo-Indian Recipe Collection.
Price per book: India : Rs130.00, Australia: A$10.00, UAE: Rs 300.00, Canada C$10.00, UK: GBP 5.00, USA: $10.00

3.A COLLECTION OF ANGLO-INDIAN ROASTS, CASSEROLES AND BAKES is a practical and easy guide to delectable cooking. The clear step-by-step instructions describe the preparation of a variety of easy to prepare Anglo-Indian Roasts, Casseroles and Bakes such as Shepherd’s Pie, Washerman’s Pie, Roast Chicken, Macaroni and Mince, etc. A few Vegetarian Bakes and casserole dishes are also featured.
Price per book in  India : Rs130.00, Australia: A$10.00, UAE: Rs 300.00, Canada C$10.00, UK: GBP 5.00, USA: $10.00

4.THE ANGLO-INDIAN FESTIVE HAMPER is a collection of popular Anglo-Indian festive treats, such as Cakes, Sweets, Christmas goodies, Puddings, Sandwiches, Preserves, Home-made Wines, etc, etc. The repertoire is rich and quite vast and takes you on a sentimental and nostalgic trip of old forgotten delicacies. These mouth watering concoctions are a mix of both ‘European’ and ‘Indian’, thus making it a veritable “Anglo-Indian” Festive Hamper. The easy-to-follow directions make the preparation of these old, popular, mouth watering goodies, simple, enjoyable and problem-free.
Price per book: India : Rs130.00, Australia: A$10.00, UAE: Rs 300.00, Canada C$10.00, UK: GBP 5.00, USA: $10.00

5. THE ANGLO-INDIAN SNACK BOX is a collection of simple and easy to follow recipes of tasty snacks, short eats, nibbles and finger food. The repertoire covers a variety of vegetarian as well as non-vegetarian snacks which includes savouries, sandwiches, wraps, rolls, pastries, sweets etc and can easily be prepared from ingredients commonly available at home.
Price per book in  India : Rs130.00, Australia: A$10.00, UAE: Rs 300.00, Canada C$10.00, UK: GBP 5.00, USA: $10.00

6. VEGETARIAN DELICACIES is a collection of simple and easy recipes of delectable Vegetarian Dishes. The repertoire is rich and vast, ranging from simple Soups and Salads, to mouth watering Curries, Stir fries, Rice dishes, Casseroles and Baked Dishes and popular Accompaniments. The easy-to-follow directions, using easily available ingredients, make cooking these dishes simple, enjoyable and problem-free. The book also highlights the goodness of each vegetable and their nutritive and curative properties in preventing and curing many health disorders.
Price per book in India : Rs150.00, Australia: A$15.00, UAE: Rs 350.00, Canada C$15.00, UK: GBP 8.00, USA: $15.00

7. SIMPLE EGG DELICACIES is a collection of simple and easy recipes of delectable Egg Dishes for Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner and for all other times as well.  The repertoire ranges from simple Breakfast Egg Dishes and Egg Salads, to mouth watering Curries, Tea Time treats, Sandwiches, Casseroles and Baked Dishes. The recipes are extremely easy to follow and only easily available ingredients have been suggested. - A real treat for ‘Eggetarians’.
Price per book in India : Rs130.00, Australia: A$10.00, UAE: Rs 300.00, Canada C$10.00, UK: GBP 5.00, USA: $10.00
 
A whole set of 7 books costs as under which includes the Postage and handling:

In India only   Rs. 1100.00   -  Payment through Cheque or Money order

Australia: A$80.00, UAE:  Rs 3000.00, Canada C$80.00, UK: GBP 45.00, USA: $80.00

Payment through Western Union or Pay Pal  only

For copies contact:  Bridget Kumar

Tel: 080 25504137 / 98455 71254 / 98440 444236

Thursday, August 14, 2014

BENGAL LANCERS SHRIMP CURRY OR COL. SKINNER'S SHRIMP CURRY




Lt. Colonel James Skinner or ‘Sikandar Sahib’ was the son of a Scottish British Army officer attached to the East India Company and his Rajput wife. James Skinner (1778-1841) also known as 'Sikander Sahib founded the Irregular Cavalry called 'Skinner's Horse' or the 'Yellow Boys' after their distinctive uniform in plains of Hansi in 1803. The two cavalry regiments he raised for the British were known as 1st Skinner's Horse and 3rd Skinner's Horse (formerly 2nd Skinner's Horse)  the most famous cavalry regiments during the Raj. Brought up by Christian and Hindu parents, he married a Muslim. As a tribute for his recovery from battle wounds he built the famous St. James Church which is also known as Skinner’s Church at Kashmiri Gate in Delhi in 1836. It is reported that he also built a mosque and a temple in Delhi.
Skinner’s Horse Regiment , which is still part of the Indian Army was renamed the 1st Bengal Cavalry and then again renamed as the The Bengal Lancers. The recipe for this Shrimp Curry purportedly originated in this Army Regiment Mess (and was later incorporated in the menus of the other Regimental Messes during the time of the Raj), hence the name Bengal Lancers Shrimp Curry. Incidentally, a Sweet mango Chutney is also attributed to Lt. Col James Skinner aptly called Col Skinner’s Mango Chutncy

RECIPE FOR THE BENGAL LANCERS SHRIMP CURRY
Serves 6   Preparation and cooking Time 45 minutes
Ingredients
1 kg medium size Shrimps / Prawns (cleaned and de-veined)
2 medium size tomatoes chopped
3 onions sliced finely
2 teaspoons chillie powder
½ teaspoon turmeric powder
1 teaspoon cumin powder
1 teaspoon coriander powder (optional)
Salt to taste
1 teaspoon chopped ginger
2 teaspoons chopped garlic
3 tablespoons oil
2 tablespoons vinegar
1. Marinate the shrimps / prawns with the chillie powder, turmeric powder, cumin powder, coriander powder, vinegar and salt and keep aside for 15 minutes.
2. Heat the oil in a pan and fry the onions and the chopped garlic and ginger till golden brown.
3. Add the tomatoes and fry till the tomatoes turn pulpy.
4. Add the marinated prawns / shrimps and mix well. Fry for 2   minutes on high heat.
5. Add 1 cup of water and cook on medium heat for about 15 to 20 minutes till the prawns / shrimps are cooked.
The gravy should be semi-dry. Garnish with chopped coriander leaves
Serve with rice, Bread or Chapattis

Friday, August 08, 2014

ANGLO-INDIAN PORK PICKLE


A delicious accompaniment with White Steamed Rice and Pepper Water or Dol Curry!!

Ingredients

½ kg boneless pork preferably without fat, cut into small bits
3 tablespoons chillie powder
½ teaspoon turmeric powder
2 teaspoons cumin powder
1 teaspoon mustard powder
1 teaspoon all fenugreek (methi)  powder
1 tablespoon chopped garlic
1 teaspoon chopped ginger
1 teaspoon black salt (optional)
Salt to taste
1 cup Refined Oil or Sesame oil
2 cups vinegar
 
Method
1. Wash the pork well and leave to dry for some time.
2. Heat the oil in a pan and sauté the garlic and ginger till light brown.
3. Add the pork and fry well till the pork hardens and is almost dry
4. Mix in the chillie powder, cumin powder, mustard powder, fenugreek (methi) powder, turmeric, vinegar, black salt and salt and mix well.
5. Cook on low heat till the pork is cooked and the gravy is almost dry.
6. Remove from heat and cool the pickle.
7. When completely cold, store in Bottles and use when required.
This pickle will last for about a month.

Monday, July 28, 2014

KHOW SUEY - AN ANGLO-BURMESE DISH

This Anglicized Burmese dish is a wonderful, delicious mouth watering concoction of noodles, spicy chicken curry and lots of toppings. While the noodles and chicken curry form the base of this dish, it allows each one to choose their own toppings. As the name suggests, it is a Burmese dish, but was brought into Eastern India when many Indians fled from Burma and crossed over into India during World War II. This recipe is featured in my Recipe Book ANGLO-INDIA CUISINE - A LEGACY OF FLAVOURS FROM THE PAST
 RECIPE FOR ANGLO-BURMESE KHOW SUEY
Serves 6
Preparation time 45 minutes
Ingredients:
1 kg Chicken boiled and shredded (discard bones)
1 teaspoon whole black pepper corns
2 Bay leaves
2 pieces cinnamon bark (about one inch in size)
Salt to taste
2 medium sized onions chopped fine
2 teaspoons garlic and ginger paste
1 teaspoon chillie powder
1 cup cooked and mashed moong dhal (yellow split lentils)
2 tablespoons fish sauce (optional)
2 teaspoons coriander powder
1 teaspoon cumin powder
1 teaspoon garam masala / all spice powder
2 teaspoons red chilli powder
1 cup coconut milk
Salt to taste
500 grams thin egg noodles

For the garnish:
1 cup spring onions chopped fine
2 onions sliced finely and fried golden brown
4 tablespoons chopped garlic fried in oil
1 cup boiled eggs chopped into tiny pieces
5 tablespoons dry prawn powder (make by coarsely grinding dry prawns)
1 cup chopped coriander leaves
Juice of 1 lemon

Heat 2 tablespoons oil in a deep heavy-bottomed pan and sauté the onions, black pepper corns, bay leaves, and cinnamon sticks till the onions turn golden brown. Add the ginger and garlic paste and fry for 2 minutes. Add the shredded chicken, coriander powder, cumin powder, red chillie powder and garam masala / spice powder and fry for another 5 minutes. Mix in the cooked moong dhal / lentil paste, coconut milk, fish sauce and salt and cook till the chicken is tender. Keep aside.

Boil the noodles in sufficient water with a little salt. Strain and run cold water over them. Pour 1 tablespoon of oil over the noodles to keep them from sticking, and toss to mix well. Keep aside.

Now heat 3 tablespoons of oil in a small pan till very hot. Turn off the flame and add 1 tbsp of red chillie powder to this oil. Keep this chillie oil aside to cool.

Serve each person individually in deep bowls as follows:
Place a single serving of noodles in the bowl. Top generously with the chicken curry prepared as above. Now top up with the chopped fried garlic, fried onions, chopped spring onion, and boiled egg, one on top of the other as per preference. Drizzle with chillie oil and sprinkle dry prawn powder according to taste. Garnish with chopped coriander leaves. Add a dash of lemon to complete. Have a bowl of chopped green chillies in vinegar as an accompaniment

The Khowsuey can also be served with plain egg noodles and the chicken curry in a big bowl. The toppings of
Fried Garlic, Fried Onions, Chopped Spring onions, Chopped boiled eggs, Chopped green chillies in vinegar,
Lime wedges and Ground dry shrimp powder could be served in small bowls and each person could top up their own bowls as per their preference

Sunday, July 20, 2014

FISH AND BOILED EGG KEDGEREE




 
This dish ‘Kedgeree” was first introduced by the Scottish Soldiers in Army Camps in Calcutta. The Fish Kedgeree is an Anglicised version of the Indian Kitchri or Kitchidi, which was prepared with rice, lentils, raisins, etc along with the addition of Fried Fish Flakes (Halibut) and hard boiled eggs. Fish, either steamed or fried was a regular item for breakfast during the Raj and the cooks tried to incorporate it with local dishes. Eventually the Fish Kedegeree became a hot cooked spicy dish, with the addition of various spices and was invariably included in the breakfast menu all over the Commonwealth.  Minced meat was also later added as a variation.
Recipe for FISH AND BOILED EGG KEDGEREE
Serves 6     Preparation Time 45 minutes
Ingredients
½ kg of any good fleshy fish cut into thick fillets
2 cups raw rice or Basmati Rice
4 tablespoons oil
1 tablespoon ghee or butter
3 onions sliced finely
3 green chillies sliced lengthwise
4 tablespoons Green Gram Dhal (Moong dhal)  or Red Lentils (Masoor Dhal)  (Or any other lentils or your choice)
3 cloves
2 small sticks of cinnamon
1 teaspoon cumin powder
100 grams Sultanas or Raisins (Optional)
3 tablespoons chopped coriander leaves
2 Bay leaves
Salt to taste
1 teaspoon chillie powder
1 tablespoon lime juice / lemon juice / vinegar
6 whole peppercorns
4 hard-boiled eggs shelled
Wash the fish and cook it in a little water along with the bay leaves and salt for about 5 minutes or till the pieces are firm. Strain and keep aside.  Add sufficient water to the left over fish soup to get 6 cups of liquid.  Remove the bones and skin from the boiled fish and break into small pieces. Wash the Rice and dhal and keep aside.
Heat the oil in a suitable vessel and sauté the onions, cloves and cinnamon lightly. Add the slit green chillies, whole peppercorns, cumin powder and chillie powder and sauté for a few minutes. Add the rice and dhal and mix well. Now add 6 cups of the soup, limejuice / vinegar, sultanas, chopped coriander leaves and salt and cook on high heat till boiling. Reduce heat and simmer covered till the rice and dhal are cooked and slightly pasty. Gently mix in the cooked fish, butter / ghee and the hard-boiled eggs. Cover and let the rice draw in the fish for a few minutes. Serve hot or cold with Chutney or Lime Pickle.
 
 

Tuesday, July 08, 2014

PORK POT ROAST

An easy recipe for delicous and mouth watering Anglo-Indian Pork Pot Roast. Goes well with Pepper Water and Rice for lunch or with Bread for Dinner. Makes a lovely and tasty filling for sandwhiches too!!! 

Serves 6   Preparation time 1 hour
Ingredients
1 chunk of pork weighing around 2 kgs with fat and lard
3 whole potatoes boiled and peeled
3 whole red chillies 
1 teaspoon pepper corns
1teaspoon red chillie powder
1/2 teaspoon pepper powder / ground pepper
3 cloves
1 Bay leaf
Salt to taste
Marinate the pork with the salt, chillie powder and pepper powder for half an hour. Place the marinated pork in a  suitable pan together with the red chillies, peppercorns, spices, bay leaf and a tablespoon of oil and fry for a few minutes turning the pork around till it changes colour. Add sufficient water and cook on medium heat till the pork is tender. Now add the whole potatoes and mix well. Simmer on low heat (turning the meat around) till the Pork and Potatoes are nicely browned on all sides.
Alternately, the meat could  be roasted with all the above ingredients in an oven for 2 hours or till the meat is soft and brown.

Tuesday, July 01, 2014

CULINARY WORKSHOP ON ANGLO-INDIAN DISHES IN BANGALORE - BRIDGET WHITE

LEARN HOW TO COOK ANGLO-INDIAN DISHES - A ONE OF A KIND CULINARY WORKSHOP IN BANGALORE



A Culinary Workshop on ANGLO-INDIAN DISHES by BRIDGET WHITE-KUMAR (Independent Food Consultant and Author of 7 recipe books on Anglo-Indian Cuisine) hosted by DIFFERENT STROKES CREATIVE LEARNING AND ACTIVITY CENTRE, Indiranagar, Bangalore.

Date: Saturday, 19th August 2014
Time: 11.00 AM to 3.00 PM
Workshop Fees: Rs. 2,500/- (all inclusive)
Venue: Different Strokes Creative Learning & Activity Centre, #65, 4th Cross, 10th Main, Indiranagar 2nd Stage, Bangalore 560 038,
Phone : 98861 52504

DISHES THAT WILL BE TAUGHT AT THE COOKING WORKSHOP
1. Anglo-Indian Yellow Coconut Rice
2. Chicken Vindaloo
3. A Colonial Anglo-Indian Dinner Platter of Pepper Chicken Roast with Mashed Potatoes, Steamed Veggies and Grilled Tomatoes
4. Devilled Eggs
5. Bread Pudding
ABOUT THE WORKSHOP
· It will be an interactive and hands on workshop where the participants will assist in cutting, chopping and preparation of the dishes
· They will learn about the History and Evolution of Anglo-Indian Cuisine and how the various dishes got their names.
· Participants will learn how to plate and serve the dishes prepared at the workshop and will enjoy the same for their lunch.
· Each participant will get to take home the Recipes of the dishes prepared at the workshop.
· A special Apron and a copy of Bridget’s new Recipe Book “SIMPLE EGG DELICACIES’ would be gifted to each participant.

The Workshop is limited to 20 persons so Registrations will be on a First Come First Served Basis.
To Register for this’ one of a kind workshop’ please contact Umesh Prasad: 98861 52504
https://www.facebook.com/#!/different.strokes.clac